Thursday, March 16, 2017

Kristen's interview with the Metro for 'Personal Shopper'

Say what you want about Kristen Stewart but she knows how to shock a red carpet. Just the other day, at the New York premiere of her new film Personal Shopper, she stunned everyone in a floor-length halterneck Chanel gown and dyed-blonde buzz cut.

Practical, severe, chic — it’s typical of Stewart’s style, one she’s been developing long before vampire franchise Twilight turned her into a megastar in 2008.

It’s why she appreciates the work of her stylist, Tara Swennen, who can regularly be found on Instagram posting pictures of Stewart.

‘I have a really open and involved collaboration with my stylist,’ says the actress. ‘I’m not remotely dressed by someone. But she’s known me for so many years. I’ve been working with her since I was 13, so she can highlight who I am, rather than make me something else.’

We meet before the New York red carpet, when the 27-year-old isn’t rocking quite such a severe look, just a white vest-top, navy trousers and black trainers.

Her blonde hair is falling over her shoulders, her green eyes accentuated with dark eye shadow.

Around her neck are silver chains, one with a mini-padlock on it. ‘I like them,’ she murmurs, ‘but they are not symbolic of anything.’

Maybe she should be wearing a cross, given the subject of Personal Shopper. Set in Paris, Stewart plays Maureen, who — when she’s not seeking out designer gowns for her supermodel boss — communes with the spirit world. Part-thriller, part-psychological portrait, it’s a tense yet teasing tale as Stewart’s amateur medium, desperate to speak to her late brother, becomes increasingly haunted.

Oddly, it’s her second ‘assistant’ role in a row for director Olivier Assayas, after 2014’s Clouds Of Sils Maria, in which she played the PA to Juliette Binoche’s actress.

‘Maureen is stuck in a very dark place in her mind,’ says Stewart. ‘I know that feeling — having physical manifestations of anxiety based on really lofty questions that you’re never going to have answers to. How the hell do you get out of that thought process? I think the way you do that is not by meaninglessly distracting yourself but by finding a peace in not knowing.’

After dating her Twilight co-star Robert Pattinson, Stewart has spoken openly about her sexuality, and has had partners including French singer Soko and current squeeze, model Stella Maxwell.

‘I’m just trying to acknowledge that fluidity, that greyness, which has always existed,’ she recently told one interviewer.

You can imagine conservative studio heads blanching at such confessions, but she couldn’t care less. Acting since childhood in films such as Panic Room, Stewart says she’s not that career-conscious. ‘I work very instinctively and it’s all about gut [instinct],’ she says.

It’s why these days you’re more likely to find her in recent indie film Certain Women than a blockbuster.

‘Doing soul-fulfilling work is when I’m finding myself and not hiding,’ she says. Not that she doesn’t know how to have fun: see comedies such as American Ultra and the Rolling Stones video Ride ’Em On Down.

She’s now working behind the camera, having directed the Take Me To The South video for Sage + The Saints and her first short, Come Swim, which premiered at Sundance.

‘That is one change in direction I’m definitely going to try and focus on,’ she says. Calling all the shots — it beats being the assistant.

In Personal Shopper, Kristen Stewart spends her time browsing haute couture stores and even trying on the slinky outfits belonging to her character’s supermodel boss. But in real life, does she have a massive wardrobe?

‘I have a lot of sneakers! I’m really sneaker-obsessed. But, no, not really,’ she says. ‘All this stuff we wear is being lent to us. I try to keep little pieces that feel like mine but I don’t have that much stuff.’

Stewart is not afraid to mix it up either. When she hosted Saturday Night Live recently, she wore Christian Louboutin heels with a $78 Spanx slip dress. And while it’s rare to see her at a fashion show, she has modelled for Chanel. ‘There’s nothing wrong with appreciating beauty and aesthetic,’ she says.

‘The people who are drawn to fashion for genuine reasons are the artists and are those who can appreciate that art.

‘Those drawn to it because of the attention that it brings and the potential popularity contest that they have a chance of winning... that’s just self-serving. It’s really selfish and it’s not beautiful at all.’


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